Santa Monica as the New Silicon Valley

Still Wondering Why Silicon Beach Real Estate Is Skyrocketing?

The New York Times reports:

Honest Company
Honest Company in Santa Monica

LOS ANGELES — It was a Monday night, but Bar Marmont was packed. Women milled about in high heels and cropped fur coats (it was 50 degrees outside, this city’s version of a polar vortex). Hair had been meticulously coaxed into face-flattering waves, makeup freshly applied. “I’m going to get a massage on my lunch break tomorrow,” a woman at the bar told her friend, as she fiddled with a large gold necklace.

Nearby, Mark Salling, an actor from “Glee,” mingled with pals, and — wait, was that the guy who plays the British doctor on “The Mindy Project”? (Yes.) Beyoncé’s “Drunk in Love” was blaring. A model-like brunette wearing a rhinestone headband twerked gently in front of a GIF machine, the latest iteration of a photo booth, and made a halfhearted attempt at a duck face.

The party was not celebrating a movie premiere or a new perfume, but a collaboration between Tinder, the social network based in West Hollywood, Calif., and Glamour magazine, which now offers celebrity dating advice on Tinder’s smartphone app. Cupcakes decorated with the companies’ logos had been made for the occasion. “There is a lot of synergy between the two brands,” said Justin Mateen, a founder of Tinder. “It’s something that’s organic.”

Synergy and organic are not words unfamiliar to Los Angeles, of course, but over the last few years, they are increasingly being applied not to entertainment deals and juicing regimens but Internet start-ups. So many of these now populate the boardwalk and beachfront real estate of Venice and Santa Monica that the area has become known as Silicon Beach, a three-mile strip where you’re as likely to find Warby Parkers and MacBooks as surf and skateboards.

And some still wonder why Silicon Beach real estate is through the roof. As the press catches up with what insiders already know, we can only expect housing prices to go one way. 😉 See the full story at www.nytimes.com.

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